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    Gotheborg.com

    Hot Water Plates, with birds and flowers?

    I have four plates with birds and flowers. The plate itself is heavy ironstone 3 lbs. each, the mark looks to be from Japan.

    I was told that these might be Hot Water Plates.

    They have a base that looks like it would sit on something.

    If you can add any information on the use and age it will be most helpful.


    Modern Chinese

    Regarding you plate, I would say it is more or less new.

    It is made in China and the mark is a type of "Qianlong" seal mark that came into use in the early 20th century when they did not really know what mark to use.

    If it is a hot water plate or not I don't know. Is it hollow? Otherwise my best guess is that they are decorative serving dishes with the holes in the base added to simplify wall hanging.

    I enclose a picture of a 18th century hot water plate for your comparison. Notice the nice little cork in the chain, to keep the hot water inside. Nice treat. Unfortunately the actual use of - hot - water seems to have made all old ones to crack :-)

    Thank you for your interest.

    Best regards,
    Jan-Erik Nilsson

    www.710.com